Creasing Tiles

Strong, durable and reliable

Creasing Tiles

The perfect tile for use in exposed situations

 

Tile creasing has been employed for many centuries as a means of shedding water and preventing dampness in walls, as well as for visual effect when used to construct fine details in brick and stone walls.

 

A creasing tile is a flat slab of fired clay; unlike a plain tile it has no nibs, no holes, and no cambers. Although technically a tile, made in the same way and to the same standards as a clay plain tile, it is generally used more like a brick. Creasing tiles can be cut more accurately than a brick, and they can be used to good visual effect by adding contrast of scale and texture in brick and stone work.

 

In addition to their visual qualities, their low water absorption and durability make them particularly suitable for situations subject to excessive weathering, such as projecting drip courses.

 

Their resistance to rising and penetrating damp, and their ability to form a strong bond with a mortar make them an ideal damp-proofing medium for freestanding walls.

Boundary Wall

Freestanding walls

 

Freestanding walls, such as boundary walls, are subjected to lateral loads. Most DPC materials in common use form a relatively weak bond with mortar, thus reducing the lateral stability of the wall along the DPC.

 

The use of two or more courses of DPC bricks (units of low water absorption) adjacent to the ground, set in a strong mortar will avoid this problem. Creasing tiles in two or more courses can provide an effective DPC under the capping and, with a generous projection from both faces of the wall can form a protective drip feature.

Boundary Wall

Openings

 

Creasing tiles can be used to provide window cills and protection to the heads of door and window openings. Two courses of tiles projected from the face of the wall form an efficient weather resistant cill.

 

Three or four courses of tiles corbelled out at the head of an opening can significantly increase its weather protection; this can be particularly valuable where the frame is subjected to severe exposure.

Parapet Walls

Parapet Walls

 

Two or three courses of tiles, beneath the parapet coping will help to inhibit the passage of moisture down the wall. If these courses are detailed to project from the face of the wall they will also serve to throw water away from the face of the brickwork.

Chimneys

Chimneys

 

Two courses of tiles, properly bonded and fully bedded in mortar projecting beneath the chimney capping will assist in preventing the ingress of moisture.

 

In addition, two courses of tiles set just above the junction of the chimney with the roof will deter moisture from passing from the external masonry to the internal masonry, without impairing the structural stability of the stack.

 

For technical details please download a copy of our creasing tile flyer below:

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